Making a Living Making a Difference

The Prescott College and City Year Partnership

 

"With the faculty we have to run this program, there isn’t a college in the country that can truly compete with it. We have professors that are on the ground in the mix of national and international social justice and human rights issues."

Prescott College is partnering with City Year to offer exclusive City Year Fellowships to corps members, staff, and alumni who apply to the new Master of Arts program in Social Justice and Human Rights.

“Our missions and values are a perfect match.” said Ted Bouras, Director of Admissions for the new Prescott College graduate program who led the partnership effort. City Year is an education focused, nonprofit organization that unites young people of all backgrounds for a year of full-time service to keep students in school and on track to graduation. Corps members serve in one U.S. location for the duration of their service year. City Year operates in more than 20 U.S. locations and with two international affiliates in Johannesburg, South Africa and London, England. Click on the following link to learn more about the Prescott College/City Year Fellowship program: http://alumni.cityyear.org/?Prescott.

"There is natural alignment between the City Year experience and the mission of Prescott College's M.A. in Social justice and Human Rights program," says Sean McDevitt, City Year's Senior Director of Alumni and Career Services. "Our graduates will be able to integrate the lessons and perspectives from their service year with the social theories, analytics and field-based learning of human rights challenges through this unique master's program. As alumni of Prescott College and City Year, these dedicated leaders will have the skills and training to deepen their impact in communities across the nation and world."

About the Resident Master of Arts program in Social Justice and Human Rights

When it came time to develop new reseident graduate programs, faculty were asked to brainstorm – to dream up their ideal curriculum, and they looked to one of the principles we hold most dear. It’s a key term in our motto: “for the liberal arts, the environment, and social justice.”

The Master of Arts degree in Social Justice and Human Rights*, our first resident graduate program, is designed to prepare students to tackle injustice and inequality--economic, social, political and environmental.
The curriculum enables the development of the practical and analytical skills, experiences, and connections required to collaborate toward social justice at all levels. Areas of concentration within the program include: human rights advocacy and research, grassroots community organizing, and strategic media and communications.

“With the faculty we have to run this program, there isn’t a college in the country that can truly compete with it,” says Paul Burkhardt, College Provost. “We have professors that are on the ground in the mix of national and international social justice and human rights issues.”

And that’s exactly where scholars in the program will find themselves the minute they start. Students will spend their first semester in the field; the charter class will begin with a month-long, intensive orientation in Los Angeles gaining hands-on field experience, preparing them to get the most out of the College’s theory and practice-based pedagogical approach.

“We don’t study social justice as an object,” explains Mary Poole, director of the program. “We engage with people who are engaged with social justice work".

Following the intensive orientation the fall term incorporates learning on the road in Arizona in a team-taught suite of courses led by scholar/practitioners with longstanding involvement in social justice movements and organizations in the region. Students are immersed in many of the issues that make Arizona a microcosm of the global crises of the 21st century, including militarization and conflict on the US-Mexico border, immigrant rights, environmental and economic justice, the expansion of incarceration and surveillance, indigenous struggles for tribal land rights and cultural survival, and conflicts over education and racial and ethnic justice.

To be considered for a City Year Fellowship, Founder’s Fellowship, or a Graduate Fellowship applications must be received by April 15. The final application deadline for the Fall 2012 enrollment is May 15, 2012. Questions can be directed to Ted Bouras, Director of Admissions, Distance Learning and On-Campus Graduate Programs 877-350-2100 ext 2101 or tbouras@prescott.edu

 

*This program is pending approval from the Higher Learning Commission

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