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Jim Waid (Tucson, Ariz.)

June 21 - August 3

 

I try to make the painting akin to taking a walk; connecting the physical experience (feet on the ground/paint on the canvas) to movement, energy, and space which the viewer can enter and travel in a multitude of ways.

Jim Waid has lived and worked in Tucson for over 30 years. His work has been exhibited in galleries and museums around the country, and is in the collection of museums such as the The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tucson Museum of Art, The University of Arizona Museum of Art, The Phoenix Art Museum, Smith College Museum of Art, and San Antonio Museum of Art. 

Jim received a BFA from the University of New Mexico and a MFA from the University of Arizona. From 1971-1980 he taught art at Pima Community College. In 1985 he received a National Endowment for the Visual Arts Fellowship. He has been a "Visiting Artist" at the University of Idaho, Arizona State University, The University of Texas at San San Antonio, and the University of Oklahoma. He has created two public art works in Tucson, a 5' x 59' mural at the Columbus Branch Library, and a 9' x 50' mural at the Evo DeConcini Federal Courthouse. He is represented by the Riva Yares Galleries in Scottsdale, the Jean Albano Gallery in Chicago, and the William Havu Gallery in Denver.

In Jim's words: " My work carries observations of the natural world into the studio, combining the organic and the artificial, the lifelike and the abstract. I try to make the painting akin to taking a walk; connecting the physical experience (feet on the ground/paint on the canvas) to movement, energy, and space which the viewer can enter and travel in a multitude of ways. It is not the neutral reception of the complete world but the coconstruction of reality with brain-meets-the-world. The work is without a formula and I work with no physical hierarchies or imperatives. 

This leads to the ever shifting surface, mark, texture, density, etc, within each painting. These series of episodic gestures, momentary thoughts and local feelings occur linearly but, meeting on a single surface, accumulate into much more. My painting is not a mechanism that captures and displays existing visible data, but an engine to create a way of looking. It does not reproduce the visible, what is commonly seen, but makes visible what commonly is not seen. Improvisation is essential to my work. I want my ideas to be located at the tip of my brush. I want my materials to talk back to me. I want to be surprised".

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