Technology alert: My Academic Services Downtime. Click for more.

 

Fourth through Sixth Grade Education

An extensive program delivered weekly over the course of the academic year

 
Kids Drawing on the Beach,

"Students expand their understanding of the ecology and conservation of the globally unique and important marine and island ecosystems of the region . . ."

Fourth grade - Marine and Island Ecosystems of the Gulf of California

The fourth grade program was initiated in 2003 through a partnership with the Federal Gulf Island Reserve of the Commission for National Protected Areas (CONANP). The curriculum has been adapted by the EEP over the years to create an extensive program delivered weekly over the course of the entire school year. Students expand their understanding of the ecology and conservation of the globally unique and important marine and island ecosystems of the region through art projects, creative writing, and experiential and cooperative activities.

Fifth grade - Workshops

The fifth grade program was initiated in 2009-2010 with a month of classes focused on overfishing, developed in collaboration with CONANP and the Rare Pride Campaign. From there additional workshop-based units were developed around practical themes including recycling, sustainable consumption, and community-based environmental monitoring. For example, this year two fishermen involved in a multi-institutional sea turtle monitoring group gave classes to the fifth graders about their project. This was significant in many ways, including the rare opportunity for fathers to be involved in their children’s formal education.

Sixth grade - Regional Ecology

Since 1998, the sixth grade curriculum has been developed completely by the Prescott College Kino Bay Center based on the state curriculum guidelines for 5th and 6th grade. The first half of the year introduces general ecological concepts to the classes. During the second half of the year, students are taught a diverse curriculum about local ecosystems and conservation issues. Classes involve a theoretical explanation of the topic and class activities that promote knowledge of local ecosystems. At the end of the year students participate in a field trip to Isla Alcatraz, an island that is located less than a mile from Bahia de Kino and provides perfect examples of the ecological, cultural and conservation importance of islands.

Bookmark and Share